Articles | Volume 11, issue 1
Geosci. Model Dev., 11, 429–451, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-11-429-2018

Special issue: The Lund–Potsdam–Jena managed Land (LPJmL) dynamic...

Geosci. Model Dev., 11, 429–451, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-11-429-2018

Model description paper 01 Feb 2018

Model description paper | 01 Feb 2018

Modeling vegetation and carbon dynamics of managed grasslands at the global scale with LPJmL 3.6

Susanne Rolinski et al.

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Cited articles

Abril, A. and Bucher, E. H.: The effects of overgrazing on soil microbial community and fertility in the Chaco dry savannas of Argentina, Appl. Soil Ecol., 12, 159–167, https://doi.org/10.1016/S0929-1393(98)00162-0, 1999.
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Short summary
One-third of the global land area is covered with grasslands which are grazed by or mowed for livestock feed. These areas contribute significantly to the carbon capture from the atmosphere when managed sensibly. To assess the effect of this management, we included different options of grazing and mowing into the global model LPJmL 3.6. We found in polar regions even low grazing pressure leads to soil carbon loss whereas in temperate regions up to 1.4 livestock units per hectare can be sustained.