Articles | Volume 14, issue 11
Geosci. Model Dev., 14, 6765–6780, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-14-6765-2021
Geosci. Model Dev., 14, 6765–6780, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-14-6765-2021
Methods for assessment of models
05 Nov 2021
Methods for assessment of models | 05 Nov 2021

Verification of boundary layer wind patterns in COSMO-REA2 using clear-air radar echoes

Sebastian Buschow and Petra Friederichs

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When insects fill the lower kilometers of the atmosphere, they get caught in the convergent parts of the wind field. Their concentration visualizes the otherwise invisible circulation on radar images. This study shows how clear-air radar data can be compared to simulated wind fields in terms of scale, anisotropy, and direction. Despite known difficulties with simulating these near-surface wind systems, we find decent agreement between a long-term simulation and the German radar mosaic.