Articles | Volume 17, issue 1
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-17-381-2024
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-17-381-2024
Model description paper
 | 
16 Jan 2024
Model description paper |  | 16 Jan 2024

A model for rapid PM2.5 exposure estimates in wildfire conditions using routinely available data: rapidfire v0.1.3

Sean Raffuse, Susan O'Neill, and Rebecca Schmidt

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Short summary
Large wildfires are increasing throughout the western United States, and wildfire smoke is hazardous to public health. We developed a suite of tools called rapidfire for estimating particle pollution during wildfires using routinely available data sets. rapidfire uses official air monitoring, satellite data, meteorology, smoke modeling, and low-cost sensors. Estimates from rapidfire compare well with ground monitors and are being used in public health studies across California.