Articles | Volume 16, issue 3
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-16-885-2023
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-16-885-2023
Model description paper
 | 
03 Feb 2023
Model description paper |  | 03 Feb 2023

Isoprene and monoterpene simulations using the chemistry–climate model EMAC (v2.55) with interactive vegetation from LPJ-GUESS (v4.0)

Ryan Vella, Matthew Forrest, Jos Lelieveld, and Holger Tost

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Latest update: 23 May 2024
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Short summary
Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are released by vegetation and have a major impact on atmospheric chemistry and aerosol formation. Non-interacting vegetation constrains the majority of numerical models used to estimate global BVOC emissions, and thus, the effects of changing vegetation on emissions are not addressed. In this work, we replace the offline vegetation with dynamic vegetation states by linking a chemistry–climate model with a global dynamic vegetation model.