Articles | Volume 12, issue 5
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-12-2107-2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-12-2107-2019
Methods for assessment of models
 | 
29 May 2019
Methods for assessment of models |  | 29 May 2019

Convective response to large-scale forcing in the tropical western Pacific simulated by spCAM5 and CanAM4.3

Toni Mitovski, Jason N. S. Cole, Norman A. McFarlane, Knut von Salzen, and Guang J. Zhang

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Latest update: 16 Jul 2024
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Short summary
Changes in the large-scale environment during convective precipitation events simulated by the Canadian Atmospheric Model (CanAM4.3) are compared against those simulated by the super-parameterized Community Atmosphere Model (spCAM5). Compared to spCAM5, CanAM4.3 underestimates the frequency of extreme convective precipitation and the duration of convective events are 50 % shorter. The dependence of precipitation on changes in the large-scale environment differs between CanAM4.3 and spCAM5.