Articles | Volume 12, issue 5
Geosci. Model Dev., 12, 2107–2117, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-12-2107-2019
Geosci. Model Dev., 12, 2107–2117, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-12-2107-2019
Methods for assessment of models
29 May 2019
Methods for assessment of models | 29 May 2019

Convective response to large-scale forcing in the tropical western Pacific simulated by spCAM5 and CanAM4.3

Toni Mitovski et al.

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Latest update: 08 Aug 2022
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Short summary
Changes in the large-scale environment during convective precipitation events simulated by the Canadian Atmospheric Model (CanAM4.3) are compared against those simulated by the super-parameterized Community Atmosphere Model (spCAM5). Compared to spCAM5, CanAM4.3 underestimates the frequency of extreme convective precipitation and the duration of convective events are 50 % shorter. The dependence of precipitation on changes in the large-scale environment differs between CanAM4.3 and spCAM5.