Articles | Volume 12, issue 5
Geosci. Model Dev., 12, 2107–2117, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-12-2107-2019
Geosci. Model Dev., 12, 2107–2117, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-12-2107-2019

Methods for assessment of models 29 May 2019

Methods for assessment of models | 29 May 2019

Convective response to large-scale forcing in the tropical western Pacific simulated by spCAM5 and CanAM4.3

Toni Mitovski et al.

Data sets

Input data for Mitovski et al., convection codes Toni Mitovski, Jason N. S. Cole, Norman A. McFarlane, Knut von Salzen, and Guang J. Zhang https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.2619590

Sub-hourly output over Tropical Western Pacific for June, July, August 1997 (Version v4.0) Toni Mitovski, Jason N. S. Cole, and Guang J. Zhang https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.2658842

TRMM (TMPA) Rainfall Estimate L3 3 hour 0.25 degree x 0.25 degree V7 Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) https://doi.org/10.5067/TRMM/TMPA/3H/7

Model code and software

Analysis codes for Mitovski et al. Toni Mitovski, Jason N. S. Cole, Norman A. McFarlane, Knut von Salzen, and Guang J. Zhang https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.2619590

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Short summary
Changes in the large-scale environment during convective precipitation events simulated by the Canadian Atmospheric Model (CanAM4.3) are compared against those simulated by the super-parameterized Community Atmosphere Model (spCAM5). Compared to spCAM5, CanAM4.3 underestimates the frequency of extreme convective precipitation and the duration of convective events are 50 % shorter. The dependence of precipitation on changes in the large-scale environment differs between CanAM4.3 and spCAM5.