Articles | Volume 15, issue 3
Geosci. Model Dev., 15, 1177–1194, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-15-1177-2022
Geosci. Model Dev., 15, 1177–1194, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-15-1177-2022

Model description paper 09 Feb 2022

Model description paper | 09 Feb 2022

The Flexible Modelling Framework for the Met Office Unified Model (Flex-UM, using UM 12.0 release)

Penelope Maher and Paul Earnshaw

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on gmd-2021-193', Anonymous Referee #1, 09 Aug 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on gmd-2021-193', Anonymous Referee #2, 27 Sep 2021
  • AC1: 'Comment on gmd-2021-193', Penelope Maher, 16 Nov 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Penelope Maher on behalf of the Authors (16 Nov 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (16 Nov 2021) by Patrick Jöckel
AR by Penelope Maher on behalf of the Authors (22 Nov 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (23 Nov 2021) by Patrick Jöckel
AR by Penelope Maher on behalf of the Authors (24 Nov 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Climate models do a pretty good job. But they are far from perfect. Fixing these imperfections is really hard because the models are complicated. One way to make progress is to create simpler models: think impressionism rather than realism in the art world. We changed the Met Office model to be intentionally simple and it still does a pretty good job. This will help to identify sources of model imperfections, develop new methods and improve our understanding of how the climate works.