Articles | Volume 13, issue 7
Geosci. Model Dev., 13, 2981–3009, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-13-2981-2020
Geosci. Model Dev., 13, 2981–3009, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-13-2981-2020

Model description paper 08 Jul 2020

Model description paper | 08 Jul 2020

APIFLAME v2.0 biomass burning emissions model: impact of refined input parameters on atmospheric concentration in Portugal in summer 2016

Solène Turquety et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Solène Turquety on behalf of the Authors (08 Mar 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (24 Mar 2020) by Gerd A. Folberth
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (15 Apr 2020)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (27 Apr 2020)
ED: Publish as is (05 May 2020) by Gerd A. Folberth

Post-review adjustments

AA: Author's adjustment | EA: Editor approval
AA by Solène Turquety on behalf of the Authors (29 Jun 2020)   Author's adjustment   Manuscript
EA: Adjustments approved (30 Jun 2020) by Gerd A. Folberth
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Short summary
Biomass burning emissions are a major source of trace gases and aerosols that need to be accounted for in air quality assessment and forecasting. The APIFLAME model presented in this paper allows the calculation of these emissions based on merged satellite observations at hourly time steps and kilometer scales. Implementing emissions in a chemistry transport model allows realistic simulations of fire plumes as illustrated for wildfires in Portugal in August 2016 using the CHIMERE model.