Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2023-92
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2023-92
Submitted as: development and technical paper
 | 
10 Nov 2023
Submitted as: development and technical paper |  | 10 Nov 2023
Status: a revised version of this preprint is currently under review for the journal GMD.

Updated algorithmic climate change functions (aCCF) V1.0A: Evaluation with the climate-response model AirClim V2.0

Sigrun Matthes, Simone Dietmüller, Katrin Dahlmann, Christine Frömming, Patrick Peter, Hiroshi Yamashita, Volker Grewe, Feijia Yin, and Federica Castino

Abstract. Aviation aims to reduce its climate effect by exploiting the potential of identifying alternative climate optimized aircraft trajectories. Such climate-optimized trajectories require a dedicated meteorological service in order to inform on those regions of the atmosphere where aviation emissions have a large effect on climate, for example, by contrail formation or nitrogen-oxide (NOx)-induced ozone formation. With the algorithmic Climate Change Functions (aCCFs) prototypes of a mathematical formulation for the temporal and spatial climate effects of aviation emissions in the atmosphere is provided, which relies solely on numerical weather prediction at the time and location of emissions. Based on the recently published consistent set of aCCF-V1.0, we here introduce newly derived calibration factors for the individual non-CO2 effects of aviation (NOx, water vapour, contrail cirrus) and establish version V1.0A of aCCFs (aCCF-V1.0A). ACCF-V1.0A represents an updated formulation of aCCF while exploring the current level of scientific understanding of individual climate effects of aviation emissions by evaluating quantitative estimates of climate effects with the state-of-the-art climate-response model AirClim. Individual scaling factors (i.e. AirClim calibration factors) are provided for the respective non-CO2 effects comprising contrail cirrus, water vapour and NOx-induced climate effects on ozone and methane, resulting uniformly in lower estimates in aCCF-V1.0A for all species compared to the earlier version aCCF-V1.0.

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Sigrun Matthes, Simone Dietmüller, Katrin Dahlmann, Christine Frömming, Patrick Peter, Hiroshi Yamashita, Volker Grewe, Feijia Yin, and Federica Castino

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • CEC1: 'Comment on gmd-2023-92', Juan Antonio Añel, 20 Dec 2023
    • AC1: 'Reply on CEC1', Sigrun Matthes, 12 Jan 2024
  • RC1: 'Review of Matthes et al.', Anonymous Referee #1, 11 Jan 2024
    • AC3: 'Reply on RC1', Sigrun Matthes, 19 Apr 2024
  • RC2: 'Comment on gmd-2023-92', Anonymous Referee #2, 16 Jan 2024
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Sigrun Matthes, 19 Apr 2024
Sigrun Matthes, Simone Dietmüller, Katrin Dahlmann, Christine Frömming, Patrick Peter, Hiroshi Yamashita, Volker Grewe, Feijia Yin, and Federica Castino
Sigrun Matthes, Simone Dietmüller, Katrin Dahlmann, Christine Frömming, Patrick Peter, Hiroshi Yamashita, Volker Grewe, Feijia Yin, and Federica Castino

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Short summary
Aviation aims to reduce its climate effect by identifying alternative climate-optimized aircraft trajectories. Such routing strategies requires a dedicated meteorological service in order to inform on regions of the atmosphere where aviation non-CO2 emissions have a large climate effect, e.g. by contrail formation or nitrogen-oxide (NOx)-induced ozone formation. This study presents calibration factors for individual non-CO2 effects by comparing with the climate response model AirClim.