Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2022-143
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2022-143
Submitted as: model description paper
 | 
26 Jul 2022
Submitted as: model description paper |  | 26 Jul 2022
Status: this preprint has been withdrawn by the authors.

PVN 1.0: using dynamic PFTs and restoration scenarios to model CO2 and CH4 emissions in peatlands

Tanya Juliette Rebecca Lippmann, Monique Heijmans, Han Dolman, Ype van der Velde, Dimmie Hendriks, and Ko van Huissteden

Abstract. Peatlands are the world’s largest terrestrial carbon store. Despite covering only 3 % of the planet’s land surface, peatlands store 30 % of the planet’s terrestrially available carbon. The Dutch government's 2019 National Climate Agreement committed to reduce the contribution of peatlands to total national Dutch greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, by 1 Mton CO2 per year (20 %) until 2030. Countries with similarly degraded peatlands are likely to face similar commitments in the coming years. Restoration (or rewetting) is a proposed solution to reduce land subsidence and increase carbon sequestration in agricultural peatlands but is often accompanied by large CH4 emissions.

Whilst, previous studies have investigated whether singular plant types impact the GHG emissions of peatlands, few (or no) studies have investigated the impact of plant composition on GHG emissions in peatlands. To assess the impact of dynamic vegetation on subsequent GHG fluxes in peatlands, we developed a new model, Peatland-VU-NUCOM (PVN). This is the second process-based model to date, capable of simulating dynamic vegetation, CO2, and CH4 emissions in peatlands.

The new PVN model simulates CH4 and CO2 fluxes in relation to the plant community composition. The PVN model includes plant competition, CH4 diffusion, ebullition, root, shoot, litter exudate production, below-ground decomposition, and aboveground moss development, under changing water table and climatic conditions. The model was compared against observational data collected at two sites in the Netherlands.

These results showed that plant communities impact net GHG emissions. This is the first time that a peatland emissions model is able to investigate the role of re-introducing peat forming vegetation on subsequent GHG emissions. We also found that the initial plant community influenced the potential for harvest events to reduce GHG emissions. These results indicated that plant community restoration is a critical component of peatland restoration.

This preprint has been withdrawn.

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Tanya Juliette Rebecca Lippmann, Monique Heijmans, Han Dolman, Ype van der Velde, Dimmie Hendriks, and Ko van Huissteden

Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on gmd-2022-143', Anonymous Referee #1, 30 Aug 2022

Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on gmd-2022-143', Anonymous Referee #1, 30 Aug 2022
Tanya Juliette Rebecca Lippmann, Monique Heijmans, Han Dolman, Ype van der Velde, Dimmie Hendriks, and Ko van Huissteden

Data sets

PVN model code and input data Tanya J. R. Lippmann https://bitbucket.org/tlippmann/pvn_public

Model code and software

PVN 1.0 model source code Tanya J. R. Lippmann https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.6802102

Tanya Juliette Rebecca Lippmann, Monique Heijmans, Han Dolman, Ype van der Velde, Dimmie Hendriks, and Ko van Huissteden

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Short summary
To assess the impact of vegetation on GHG fluxes in peatlands, we developed a new model, Peatland-VU-NUCOM (PVN). These results showed that plant communities impact GHG emissions, indicating that plant community re-establishment is a critical component of peatland restoration. This is the first time that a peatland emissions model investigated the role of re-introducing peat forming vegetation on GHG emissions.