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Geoscientific Model Development An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2018-317
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2018-317
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: development and technical paper 19 Dec 2018

Submitted as: development and technical paper | 19 Dec 2018

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This preprint was under review for the journal GMD. A final paper is not foreseen.

Chemistry and deposition in the Model of Atmospheric composition at Global and Regional scales using Inversion Techniques for Trace gas Emissions (MAGRITTE v1.0). Part B. Dry deposition

Jean-François Müller1, Trissevgeni Stavrakou1, Maite Bauwens1, Steven Compernolle1, and Jozef Peeters2 Jean-François Müller et al.
  • 1Royal Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Avenue Circulaire 3, 1180, Brussels, Belgium
  • 2Department of Chemistry, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200F, 3001 Leuven, Belgium

Abstract. A new module for calculating the dry deposition of trace gases is presented and implemented in the Model of Atmospheric composition at Global and Regional scales using Inversion Techniques for Trace gas Emissions (MAGRITTE v1.0). The dry deposition velocities are calculated using Wesely's classical resistance-in-series approach. While relying on analyses of the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) for meteorological fields, the aerodynamic resistance calculation module is based on the ECMWF model equations for turbulent transfer within the surface layer. The stomatal resistance for water vapour is calculated using a Jarvis-type parameterization in a multi-layer canopy environment model accounting for the leaf area index (LAI). The gas-phase diffusion coefficients needed to relate the stomatal resistances of different species are calculated from molecular structure. The cuticular, mesophyll and soil resistances depend on the species reactivity and Henry's Law constant (HLC). The HLCs of organic species for which no experimental data is available are estimated using a newly-developed prediction method based on existing methods for vapour pressures (EVAPORATION, Estimation of VApour Pressure of Organics) and infinite dilution activity coefficients (AIOMFAC, Aerosol Inorganic Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients).

Acknowledging the dominance of stomatal uptake for ozone dry deposition, the stomatal resistance model parameters for 6 of the 7 major plant functional types (PFT) are adjusted based on extensive model comparisons with field measurements of ozone deposition velocity at 24 sites worldwide. The modelled OVOC deposition velocities for 25 different OVOCs are evaluated against field data from a total of 20 studies. The comparison shows the need for a species-dependent adjustment of the canopy resistances in order to match the observed variability among different species. This is realized by multiplying the HLC of each OVOC by a species-dependent parameter f1 adjusted based on the comparisons. The values of f1 span a wide range, from values of the order of unity or less for formaldehyde and several trifunctional compounds, to > 104 for compounds seen to deposit rapidly despite their low water-solubility, like MVK, MACR, CH3CHO and PAN. Despite the acknowledged caveats of the approach, the resulting modelled deposition velocities are consistent with the existing experimental data. The results of global-scale MAGRITTE model simulations demonstrate the importance of OVOC dry deposition on their global abundance. It is found to remove from the atmosphere the equivalent of 27 % of the global NMVOC emissions on a carbon basis, as well as about 8 % of NOx emissions in the form of organic nitrates and PAN-like compounds.

This preprint has been withdrawn.

Jean-François Müller et al.

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Jean-François Müller et al.

Jean-François Müller et al.

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Short summary
A new dry deposition model for gaseous species is presented. It relies on the species reactivity and water-solubility, for which a new prediction method is also presented. The deposition model parameters are adjusted based on comparisons with field data for ozone and organic compounds at numerous sites. The importance of dry deposition as a sink of oxygenated organic compounds and nitrogen oxides is demonstrated by global model simulations with the new deposition scheme.
A new dry deposition model for gaseous species is presented. It relies on the species reactivity...
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