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https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2024-61
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2024-61
Submitted as: model description paper
 | 
30 Apr 2024
Submitted as: model description paper |  | 30 Apr 2024
Status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal GMD.

An enhanced emissions module for the PALM model system 23.10 with application on PM10 emissions from urban domestic heating

Edward C. Chan, Ilona J. Jäkel, Basit Khan, Martijn Schaap, Timothy M. Butler, Renate Forkel, and Sabine Banzhaf

Abstract. This article presents an enhanced emission module for the PALM model system, which collects discrete emission sources from different emission sectors and assigns them dynamically to the prognostic equations for specific pollutant species as volumetric source terms. Bidirectional lookup between each source location and cell index are maintained through using a hash key approach, while allowing all emission source modules to be conceived, developed and operated in a homogeneous and mutually independent manner. An additional generic emission mode has also been implemented to allow the use of external emission data in simulation runs. Results from benchmark runs indicate a high level of performance and scalability. Subsequently, a module for modelling parametrized emissions from domestic heating is implemented under this framework, using the approach of building energy usage and temperature deficit as a generalized form of heating degree days. An model run has been executed under idealized conditions by considering solely dispersion of PM10 from domestic heating sources. The results demonstrate a strong overall dependence on the strength and clustering of individual sources, diurnal variation in domestic heat usage, as well as the temperature deficit between the ambient and the user-defined target temperature. Vertical transport contributes additionally to a rapid attenuation of daytime PM10. Although urban topology plays a minor role on the pollutant concentrations at ground level, it has a relevant contribution to the vertical pollutant distribution.

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Edward C. Chan, Ilona J. Jäkel, Basit Khan, Martijn Schaap, Timothy M. Butler, Renate Forkel, and Sabine Banzhaf

Status: open (until 18 Jul 2024)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on gmd-2024-61', Anonymous Referee #1, 30 Apr 2024 reply
  • RC2: 'Referee Comment on gmd-2024-61', Anonymous Referee #2, 28 May 2024 reply
  • RC3: 'Comment on gmd-2024-61', Anonymous Referee #3, 18 Jun 2024 reply
Edward C. Chan, Ilona J. Jäkel, Basit Khan, Martijn Schaap, Timothy M. Butler, Renate Forkel, and Sabine Banzhaf
Edward C. Chan, Ilona J. Jäkel, Basit Khan, Martijn Schaap, Timothy M. Butler, Renate Forkel, and Sabine Banzhaf

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Short summary
An enhanced emission module has been developed for the PALM model system, allowing greater levels of flexibility and performance in modelling emission sources across different sectors. A model for parametrized domestic emissions has also been included, for which an idealized model run is conducted for PM10. The results show that, in addition to individual sources and diurnal variations in energy consumption, vertical transport and urban topology play a role in the PM concentration distribution.