Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2023-231
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2023-231
Submitted as: development and technical paper
 | 
10 Jan 2024
Submitted as: development and technical paper |  | 10 Jan 2024
Status: a revised version of this preprint is currently under review for the journal GMD.

Implementation of a brittle sea-ice rheology in an Eulerian, finite-difference, C-grid modeling framework: Impact on the simulated deformation of sea-ice in the Arctic

Laurent Brodeau, Pierre Rampal, Einar Òlason, and Véronique Dansereau

Abstract. We have implemented the Brittle Bingham-Maxwell sea-ice rheology (BBM) into SI3, the sea-ice component of NEMO. We describe how we achieved this numerical implementation. Specifically, we detail how we introduced a new spatial discretization framework, well adapted to solve the equations of sea-ice dynamics, in order to overcome the numerical issues posed by the use of the staggered C-grid. As a validation step, a twin hindcast experiment performed with the coupled ocean/sea-ice setup of the NEMO system, run at a 1/4° spatial resolution, serves as a basis to evaluate the simulated sea-ice deformation rates against satellite observations; when using the newly-implemented BBM rheology and when using the default viscous-plastic rheology of SI3. The results show the added value of using a brittle-type of rheology, such as BBM, to accurately simulate the highly-localized deformation patterns of sea-ice. Thus, our results highlight the relevance of the use of this newly-implemented rheology for future modeling studies that utilize a classical Eulerian sea-ice modeling framework, i.e. based on the finite-difference discretization method over a quadrilateral, staggered, computational grid. This includes, in particular, coupled climate simulations performed with CMIP-class Earth System Models at coarse to moderate spatial resolution.

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Laurent Brodeau, Pierre Rampal, Einar Òlason, and Véronique Dansereau

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • CEC1: 'Comment on gmd-2023-231', Juan Antonio Añel, 26 Jan 2024
    • AC1: 'Reply on CEC1', Laurent Brodeau, 29 Jan 2024
      • CEC2: 'Reply on AC1', Juan Antonio Añel, 29 Jan 2024
        • AC2: 'Reply on CEC2', Laurent Brodeau, 29 Jan 2024
  • AC3: 'Update of the "Code and data availability" section', Laurent Brodeau, 30 Jan 2024
  • AC4: 'Erratum Equation 16', Laurent Brodeau, 31 Jan 2024
  • RC1: 'Comment on gmd-2023-231', Anonymous Referee #1, 09 Feb 2024
    • AC5: 'Reply on RC1', Laurent Brodeau, 30 Apr 2024
  • RC2: 'Comment on gmd-2023-231', Anonymous Referee #2, 14 Feb 2024
    • AC6: 'Reply on RC2', Laurent Brodeau, 30 Apr 2024
  • RC3: 'Comment on gmd-2023-231', Mathieu Plante, 23 Feb 2024
    • AC7: 'Reply on RC3', Laurent Brodeau, 30 Apr 2024
Laurent Brodeau, Pierre Rampal, Einar Òlason, and Véronique Dansereau
Laurent Brodeau, Pierre Rampal, Einar Òlason, and Véronique Dansereau

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Short summary
A new sea-ice rheology, known as BBM, has been implemented into the sea-ice component of NEMO. We describe how a new spatial discretization framework was introduced in order to achieve this. A set of realistic ocean/sea-ice simulations of the Arctic have been performed, using BBM and the standard rheology of NEMO. When compared to satellite data, our simulations show that our implementation of BBM leads to a better representation of sea-ice deformations than the standard rheology of NEMO.