Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2023-223
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2023-223
Submitted as: model description paper
 | 
01 Dec 2023
Submitted as: model description paper |  | 01 Dec 2023
Status: a revised version of this preprint is currently under review for the journal GMD.

NEWTS1.0: Numerical model of coastal Erosion by Waves and Transgressive Scarps

Rose V. Palermo, J. Taylor Perron, Jason M. Soderblom, Samuel P. D. Birch, Alexander G. Hayes, and Andrew D. Ashton

Abstract. Models of rocky coast erosion help us understand the physical phenomena that control coastal morphology and evolution, infer the processes shaping coasts in remote environments, and evaluate risk from natural hazards and future climate change. Existing models, however, are highly complex, computationally expensive, and depend on many input parameters; this limits our ability to explore planform erosion of rocky coasts over long timescales (100s to 100,000s years) and a range of conditions. In this paper, we present a simplified cellular model of coastline evolution through uniform erosion and wave-driven erosion. Uniform erosion is modeled as a constant rate of retreat. Wave erosion is modeled as a function of fetch, the distance over which the wind blows to generate waves, and the angle between the incident wave and the shoreline. This reduced complexity model can be used to evaluate how a detachment-limited coastal landscape reflects climate, sea level history, material properties, and the relative influence of different erosional processes.

Rose V. Palermo, J. Taylor Perron, Jason M. Soderblom, Samuel P. D. Birch, Alexander G. Hayes, and Andrew D. Ashton

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Review – gmd-2023-223', Eli D Lazarus, 09 Jan 2024
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Rose Palermo, 21 Feb 2024
  • RC2: 'Review of NEWTS1.0: Numerical model of coastal Erosion by Waves and Transgressive Scarps by Palermo and colleagues.', Luca C Malatesta, 20 Jan 2024
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Rose Palermo, 21 Feb 2024
  • EC1: 'Comment on gmd-2023-223', Andrew Wickert, 26 Jan 2024
    • AC3: 'Reply on EC1', Rose Palermo, 21 Feb 2024
Rose V. Palermo, J. Taylor Perron, Jason M. Soderblom, Samuel P. D. Birch, Alexander G. Hayes, and Andrew D. Ashton
Rose V. Palermo, J. Taylor Perron, Jason M. Soderblom, Samuel P. D. Birch, Alexander G. Hayes, and Andrew D. Ashton

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Short summary
Models of rocky coastal erosion help us understand the controls on coastal morphology and evolution. In this paper, we present a simplified model of coastline erosion by either uniform erosion processes where coastline erosion is constant or wave-driven erosion where coastline erosion is a function of the wave power. This model can be used to evaluate how coastline changes reflect climate, sea level history, material properties, and the relative influence of different erosional processes.