Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2023-165
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2023-165
Submitted as: model evaluation paper
 | 
19 Sep 2023
Submitted as: model evaluation paper |  | 19 Sep 2023
Status: a revised version of this preprint was accepted for the journal GMD and is expected to appear here in due course.

Evaluation of multi-season convection permitting atmosphere - mixed layer ocean simulations of the Maritime Continent

Emma Howard, Steven Woolnough, Nicolas Klingaman, Daniel Shipley, Claudio Sanchez, Simon C. Peatman, Cathryn E. Birch, and Adrian J. Matthews

Abstract. A multi-season convection permitting regional climate simulation of the Maritime Continent using the Met Office Unified Model with 2.2-km grid spacing is presented and evaluated. The simulations pioneer the use of atmosphere-ocean coupling with the multi-column K profile parametrisation (KPP) mixed layer ocean model in atmospheric convection permitting climate simulations. Comparisons are made against a convection parametrised simulation in which it is nested, and which in turn derives boundary conditions from ERA5 reanalysis. This paper describes the configuration, performance of the mean state and variability of the two simulations compared against observational datasets. The models both have minor sea surface temperature (SST) and wet precipitation biases. The diurnal cycle, representation of equatorial waves and relationship between SST and precipitation are all improved in the convection permitting model compared to the convection parametrised model. The MJO is present in both models with a faster than observed propagation speed. However, it is unclear whether fidelity of the MJO simulation is inherent to the model or whether it predominantly arises from the forcing at the boundaries.

Emma Howard, Steven Woolnough, Nicolas Klingaman, Daniel Shipley, Claudio Sanchez, Simon C. Peatman, Cathryn E. Birch, and Adrian J. Matthews

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on gmd-2023-165', Anonymous Referee #1, 15 Nov 2023
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Emma Howard, 08 Feb 2024
  • RC2: 'Comment on gmd-2023-165', Anonymous Referee #2, 05 Jan 2024
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Emma Howard, 08 Feb 2024

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on gmd-2023-165', Anonymous Referee #1, 15 Nov 2023
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Emma Howard, 08 Feb 2024
  • RC2: 'Comment on gmd-2023-165', Anonymous Referee #2, 05 Jan 2024
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Emma Howard, 08 Feb 2024
Emma Howard, Steven Woolnough, Nicolas Klingaman, Daniel Shipley, Claudio Sanchez, Simon C. Peatman, Cathryn E. Birch, and Adrian J. Matthews

Data sets

TerraMaris Model Description Paper Datasets Emma Howard, Steven Woolnough, Nicholas Klingaman, and Daniel Shipley https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.8344912

Model code and software

TerraMaris version of KPP model Nick Klingaman and Steven Woolnough https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.8344912

Emma Howard, Steven Woolnough, Nicolas Klingaman, Daniel Shipley, Claudio Sanchez, Simon C. Peatman, Cathryn E. Birch, and Adrian J. Matthews

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Short summary
This paper describes a coupled atmosphere-mixed layer ocean simulation setup that will be used to study weather processes in South East Asia. The set up has been used to compare high resolution simulations, which are able to partially represent storms, to coarser simulations, which cannot. We compare the model performance at representing variability of rainfall and sea surface temperatures across length scales between the coarse and fine models.