Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2022-79
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2022-79
Submitted as: model description paper
02 Jun 2022
Submitted as: model description paper | 02 Jun 2022
Status: a revised version of this preprint is currently under review for the journal GMD.

Non-Redfield carbon model for the Baltic Sea (ERGOM version 1.2) – Implementation and Budget estimates

Thomas Neumann, Hagen Radtke, Bronwyn Cahill, and Martin Schmidt Thomas Neumann et al.
  • Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research Warnemünde, Seestr. 15, 18119 Rostock, Germany

Abstract. Redfield stoichiometry based marine biogeochemical models suffer from underestimating carbon fixation by primary production. Most pronounced indication of this is the overestimation of the dissolved inorganic carbon concentration and, consequently, the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in surface waters. The reduced production of organic carbon will impact most biogeochemical processes.

We propose a marine biogeochemical model allowing for a non-Redfield carbon fixation. The updated model is able to reproduce observed partial pressure of carbon dioxide and other variables of the ecosystem, like nutrients and oxygen, reasonably well. The additional carbon uptake is realized in the model by an extracellular release of dissolved organic matter from phytoplankton. Dissolved organic matter is subject to flocculation and the sinking particles remove carbon from surface waters. This approach is mechanistically different from existing non-Redfield models, which allow for flexible element ratios for the living cells of the phytoplankton itself. The performance of the model is demonstrated as an example for the Baltic Sea.

Budget estimates for carbon illustrate that the Baltic Sea acts as a carbon sink. For alkalinity, the Baltic Sea is a source due to internal alkalinity generation by denitrification. Owing to the underestimated model alkalinity, there exists still an unknown alkalinity source or underestimated land based fluxes.

Thomas Neumann et al.

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on gmd-2022-79', Tatsuro Tanioka, 11 Jun 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on gmd-2022-79', Feifei Liu, 20 Jul 2022
  • EC1: 'Comment on gmd-2022-79', Andrew Yool, 29 Jul 2022
  • AC1: 'Comment on gmd-2022-79', Thomas Neumann, 08 Sep 2022

Thomas Neumann et al.

Data sets

Model code and boundary data for "Non-Redfield carbon model for the Baltic Sea (ERGOM version 1.2) -- Implementation and Budget estimates" paper. (Version 2) Thomas Neumann https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.6560174

ERGOM 1.2 model hindcast 1948-2019 [data set] Thomas Neumann https://thredds-iow.io-warnemuende.de/thredds/catalogs/projects/integral/catalog_pocNP_V04R25_3nm_agg_time.html

Model code and software

Model code and boundary data for "Non-Redfield carbon model for the Baltic Sea (ERGOM version 1.2) -- Implementation and Budget estimates" paper. (Version 2) Thomas Neumann https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.6560174

Thomas Neumann et al.

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Short summary
Marine ecosystem models usually are constrained by elements nitrogen and phosphorus, and consider carbon in organic matter in a fixed ratio. Recent observations show a substantial deviation from the simulated carbon cycle variables. In this study, we present a marine ecosystem model for the Baltic Sea which allows for a flexible uptake ratio for carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus. With this extension, the model reflects much more reasonable variables of the marine carbon cycle.