Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2022-59
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2022-59
Submitted as: model description paper
10 Mar 2022
Submitted as: model description paper | 10 Mar 2022
Status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal GMD.

WBM: A scalable gridded global hydrologic model with water tracking functionality

Danielle S. Grogan1, Shan Zuidema1, Alex Prusevich1, Wilfred M. Wollheim1,2, Stanley Glidden1, and Richard B. Lammers1 Danielle S. Grogan et al.
  • 1Earth Systems Research Center, Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH, 03824, US
  • 2Department of Natural Resources and the Environment, University of New Hampshire, NH, 03824, USA

Abstract. This paper describes the University of New Hampshire Water Balance Model, WBM, a process-based gridded global hydrologic model that simulates the land surface components of the global water cycle and includes water extraction for use in agriculture and domestic sectors. WBM has a long publication history; here we describe the first fully open source WBM version. This version includes a suite of water source tracking modules that enable analysis of flow-path histories on water supply. Earlier descriptions of WBM methods provide the foundation of the most recent model version detailed here. WBM is available here: https://github.com/wsag/WBM. WBM is written in the perl data programming language (PDL), making use of several open-source perl libraries. As a convenience we also provide a Singularity container that simplifies installation of dependencies. We present an overview of the model functionality, utility, and validation of global river discharge and irrigation water use using data from the Global Runoff Data Centre and FAO statistics. A key feature of WBM is the ability to identify the partitioning of sources for each stock or flux within the model. Therefore, users can determine what proportion of any flux consists of each of the primary inputs of water to the surface of the terrestrial hydrologic cycle, previously extracted water for human uses, or runoff generated from any place on the Earth’s surface. Such component tracking provides both a more fully transparent model in that users can identify the underlying mechanisms generating the simulated behavior, as well as perform model experiments in new ways.

Danielle S. Grogan et al.

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on gmd-2022-59', Anonymous Referee #1, 30 Mar 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on gmd-2022-59', Anonymous Referee #2, 31 Mar 2022
  • RC3: 'Comment on gmd-2022-59', Anonymous Referee #3, 13 Apr 2022
  • RC4: 'Comment on gmd-2022-59', Anonymous Referee #4, 19 Apr 2022
  • RC5: 'Comment on gmd-2022-59', Anonymous Referee #5, 21 Apr 2022

Danielle S. Grogan et al.

Data sets

Water Balance Model (WBM) Open Source Release Version 1.0.0 Ancillary Data Grogan, D. S., Zuidema, S., Prusevich, A., Wollheim, W. M., Glidden, S., and Lammers, R. B. https://dx.doi.org/10.34051/d/2022.2

Model code and software

WBM v1.0.0 Grogan, D. S., Zuidema, S., Prusevich, A., Wollheim, W. M., Glidden, S., and Lammers, R. B. https://zenodo.org/record/6263097#.Yhhvk5PMKRs

Danielle S. Grogan et al.

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Short summary
This paper describes the University of New Hampshire Water Balance Model, WBM. This model simulates the land surface components of the global water cycle and includes water extractions for use by humans for agriculture, domestic, and industrial purposes. A new feature is described that permits tracking of water sources through the water cycle, which has implications for water resource management. This paper was written to describe a long-used model, and present its first open source version.