Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2021-280
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2021-280

Submitted as: model evaluation paper 04 Oct 2021

Submitted as: model evaluation paper | 04 Oct 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal GMD.

Assessing methane emissions for northern peatlands in ORCHIDEE-PEAT revision 7020

Elodie Salmon1, Fabrice Jégou1, Bertrand Guenet2,3, Line Jourdain1, Chunjing Qiu2, Vladislav Bastrikov4, Christophe Guimbaud1, Dan Zhu2,5, Philippe Ciais2, Philippe Peylin2, Sébastien Gogo6, Fatima Laggoun-Défarge6, Mika Aurela7, M. Syndonia Bret-Harte8, Jiquan Chen9, Bogdan H. Chojnicki10, Housen Chu11, Colin W. Edgar8, Eugenie S. Euskirchen8, Lawrence B. Flanagan12, Krzysztof Fortuniak13, David Holl14, Janina Klatt15, Olaf Kolle16, Natalia Kowalska17, Lars Kutzbach14, Annalea Lohila7, Lutz Merbold18, Włodzimierz Pawlak13, Torsten Sachs19, and Klaudia Ziemblińska20 Elodie Salmon et al.
  • 1Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l'Environnement et de l'Espace, LPC2E, UMR 7328, Université d'Orléans, CNRS, CNES, 45071 Orléans cedex 2, France
  • 2Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l’Environnement, UMR8212, CEA-CNRS-UVSQ F- 91191 Gif sur Yvette, France
  • 3Laboratoire de Géologie de l'ENS, IPSL, CNRS, PSL Research University, Laboratoire de Géologie de l'ENS, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris cedex 05, France
  • 4Science Partners, 75010 Paris, France
  • 5Sino-French Institute for Earth System Science, College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, China
  • 6Institut des Sciences de la Terre d’Orléans, Université d’Orléans, CNRS, BRGM, UMR 7327, 45071 Orléans, France
  • 7Finnish Meteorological Institute, Climate Research Programme, Helsinki, Finland
  • 8Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, USA
  • 9Landscape Ecology & Ecosystem Science (LEES) Lab, Department of Geography, Environment, and Spatial Sciences, & Center for Global Change and Earth Observations, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823
  • 10Laboratory of Bioclimatology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Protection, Faculty of Environmental Engineering and Mechanical Engineering, Poznan University of Life Sciences, Piątkowska 94, 60-649 Poznań, Poland
  • 11Climate and Ecosystem Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, USA, 1 Cyclotron Rd, Berkeley, CA 94720
  • 12Department of Biological Sciences, University of Lethbridge, 4401 University Drive, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada T1K 3M4
  • 13Department of Meteorology and Climatology, Faculty of Geographical Sciences, University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland
  • 14Institute of Soil Science, Center for Earth System Research and Sustainability (CEN), Universität Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany
  • 15Institute of Ecology and Landscape, Chair of Vegetation Ecology, University of Applied Sciences Weihenstephan-Triesdorf, Am Hofgarten 1, 85354 Freising, Germany
  • 16Field Experiments and Instrumentation, Max-Planck-Institute for Biogeochemistry,Hans-Knoell-Strasse 10, D-07745 Jena, Germany
  • 17Department of Matter and Energy Fluxes, Global Change Research Institute, Czech Academy of Sciences, Bělidla 986/4a, 603 00 Brno, Czech Republic
  • 18Department Agroecology and Environment, Agroscope, Reckenholzstrasse 191, 8046 Zurich, Switzerland
  • 19GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Telegrafenberg, Potsdam, Germany
  • 20Laboratory of Meteorology, Department of Construction and Geoengineering, Faculty of Environmental Engineering and Mechanical Engineering, Poznan University of Life Sciences, Piątkowska 94, 60-649 Poznań, Poland

Abstract. In the global methane budget, the largest natural source is attributed to wetlands that encompass all ecosystems composed of waterlogged or inundated ground, capable of methane production. Among them, northern peatlands that store large amounts of soil organic carbon have been functioning, since the end of the last glaciation period, as long-term sources of methane (CH4) and are one of the most significant methane sources among wetlands. To reduce global methane budget uncertainties, it is of significance to understand processes driving methane production and fluxes in northern peatlands. A methane model that features methane production and transport by plants, ebullition process and diffusion in soil, oxidation to CO2 and CH4 fluxes to the atmosphere has been embedded in the ORCHIDEE-PEAT land surface model which includes an explicit representation of northern peatlands. This model, ORCHIDEE-PCH4 was calibrated and evaluated on 14 peatland sites distributed on both Eurasian and American continents in the northern boreal and temperate regions. Data assimilation approaches were employed to optimized parameters at each site and at all sites simultaneously. Results show that, in ORCHIDEE-PCH4, methanogenesis is sensitive to temperature and substrate availability over the top 75 cm of soil depth. Methane emissions estimated using single site optimization (SSO) of model parameters are underestimated by 9 g CH4 m−2 year−1 on average (i.e. 50 % higher than the site average of yearly methane emissions). While using the multi-sites optimization (MSO), methane emissions are overestimated by 5 g CH4 m−2 year−1 on average across all investigated sites (i.e. 37 % lower than the site average of yearly methane emissions).

Elodie Salmon et al.

Status: open (until 29 Nov 2021)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse

Elodie Salmon et al.

Elodie Salmon et al.

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Short summary
A methane model that features methane production and transport by plants, ebullition process and diffusion in soil, oxidation to CO2 and CH4 fluxes to the atmosphere has been embedded in the ORCHIDEE-PEAT land surface model which includes an explicit representation of northern peatlands. This model, ORCHIDEE-PCH4 was calibrated and evaluated on 14 peatland sites. Results show that the model is sensitive to temperature and substrate availability over the top 75 cm of soil depth.