Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2021-240
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2021-240

Submitted as: methods for assessment of models 27 Aug 2021

Submitted as: methods for assessment of models | 27 Aug 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal GMD.

Integration-based Extraction and Visualization of Jet Stream Cores

Lukas Bösiger1, Michael Sprenger2, Maxi Böttcher2, Hanna Joos2, and Tobias Günther3 Lukas Bösiger et al.
  • 1Department of Computer Science, ETH Zurich, Switzerland
  • 2Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science, ETH Zurich, Switzerland
  • 3Department of Computer Science, FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany

Abstract. Jet streams are fast three-dimensional coherent air flows that interact with other atmospheric structures such as warm conveyor belts (WCBs) and the tropopause. Individually, these structures have a significant impact on the mid-latitude weather evolution, and the impact of their interaction is still subject of research in the atmospheric sciences. A first step towards a deeper understanding of the meteorological processes is to extract the geometry of jet streams, for which we develop an integration-based feature extraction algorithm. Thus, rather than characterizing jet coreline purely as extremal line structure of wind magnitude, our coreline definition includes a regularization to favor jet corelines that align with the wind vector field. Based on the line geometry, proximity-based filtering can automatically detect potential interactions between WCBs and jets, and results of an automatic detection of split and merge events of jets can be visualized in relation to the tropopause. Taking ERA5 reanalysis data as input, we first extract jet stream corelines using an integration-based predictor-corrector approach that admits momentarily weak air streams. Using WCB trajectories and the tropopause geometry as context, we visualize individual cases, showing how WCBs influence the acceleration and displacement of jet streams, and how the tropopause behaves near split and merge locations of jets. Multiple geographical projections, slicing, as well as direct and indirect volume rendering further support the interactive analysis. Using our tool, we obtained a new perspective onto the three-dimensional jet movement, which can stimulate follow-up research.

Lukas Bösiger et al.

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on gmd-2021-240', Anonymous Referee #1, 23 Sep 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on gmd-2021-240', Gloria Manney, 09 Oct 2021
  • CEC1: 'Comment on gmd-2021-240', Juan Antonio Añel, 12 Oct 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on CEC1', Tobias Günther, 15 Oct 2021

Lukas Bösiger et al.

Lukas Bösiger et al.

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Short summary
Jet streams are coherent air flows that interact with atmospheric structures such as warm conveyor belts (WCBs) and the tropopause. Individually, these structures have a significant impact on the weather evolution. A first step towards a deeper understanding of the meteorological processes is to extract jet stream corelines, for which we develop a novel feature extraction algorithm. Based on the line geometry, we automatically detect and visualize potential interactions between WCBs and jets.