Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2020-85
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2020-85

Submitted as: model description paper 02 Jun 2020

Submitted as: model description paper | 02 Jun 2020

Review status: a revised version of this preprint was accepted for the journal GMD and is expected to appear here in due course.

Integrated Modeling of Photosynthesis and Transfer of Energy, Mass and Momentum in the Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Continuum System

Yunfei Wang1,2,3, Yijian Zeng3, Lianyu Yu3, Peiqi Yang3, Christiaan Van de Tol3, Huanjie Cai1,2, and Zhongbo Su3,4 Yunfei Wang et al.
  • 1College of Water Resources and Architectural Engineering, Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University, Yangling, China
  • 2Institute of Water Saving Agriculture in Arid Regions of China (IWSA), Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University, Yangling, China
  • 3Faculty of Geo-Information Science and Earth Observation, University of Twente, Enschede, the Netherlands
  • 4Key Laboratory of Subsurface Hydrology and Ecological Effect in Arid Region of Ministry of Education, School of Water and Environment, Chang’an University, Xi’an, China

Abstract. Root water uptake is an important component of the terrestrial water balance and a critical factor that influences energy, water vapor, and carbon exchange among soil, vegetation and atmosphere interfaces. However, most of the current vegetation photosynthesis models do not account for root water uptake, which compromises their applications under water stressed conditions. To address this limitation, this study integrates photosynthesis and transfer of energy, mass and momentum in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum system, via a simplified 1D root growth model and a resistance scheme (from soil, through root zones and plants, to atmosphere). The coupled model was evaluated with field measurement of a maize canopy. The results indicated that the simulation of land surface fluxes was significantly improved due to considering the root water uptake, especially when vegetation is experiencing sever water stress. This finding highlights the importance of enhanced soil heat and moisture transfer, as well as dynamic root distribution, on simulating ecosystem functioning.

Yunfei Wang et al.

 
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Yunfei Wang et al.

Data sets

Data underlying the research on Seasonal and interannual variation in evapotranspiration, energy flux, and Bowen ratio over a dry semi-humid cropland in Northwest China Wang Yunfei, Cai HuanJie, Zeng YiJian, Su Zhongbo, and Yu LianYu https://doi.org/10.4121/uuid:aa0ed483-701e-4ba0-b7b0-674695f5f7a7

Model code and software

Integrated Modeling of Photosynthesis and Transfer of Energy, Mass and Momentum (SCOPE_STEMMUS v1.0) Wang Yunfei, Zeng YiJian, Yu LianYu, Yang Peiqi, Christiaan Van der Tol C, Su Zhongbo, and Cai HuanJie https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3839092

Yunfei Wang et al.

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Short summary
This study integrates photosynthesis and transfer of energy, mass, and momentum in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum system, via a simplified 1D root growth model. The results indicated that the simulation of land surface fluxes was significantly improved due to considering the root water uptake, especially when vegetation is experiencing severe water stress. This finding highlights the importance of enhanced soil heat and moisture transfer on simulating ecosystem functioning.