Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2020-367
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2020-367

Submitted as: review and perspective paper 08 Jan 2021

Submitted as: review and perspective paper | 08 Jan 2021

Review status: a revised version of this preprint was accepted for the journal GMD and is expected to appear here in due course.

Understanding each other's models: a standard representation of global water models to support improvement, intercomparison, and communication

Camelia-Eliza Telteu1, Hannes Müller Schmied1,2, Wim Thiery3, Guoyong Leng4, Peter Burek5, Xingcai Liu4, Julien Eric Stanislas Boulange6, Lauren Seaby Andersen7, Manolis Grillakis8, Simon Newland Gosling9, Yusuke Satoh6, Oldrich Rakovec10,11, Tobias Stacke12, Jinfeng Chang13,14, Niko Wanders15, Harsh Lovekumar Shah16, Tim Trautmann1, Ganquan Mao17, Naota Hanasaki6, Aristeidis Koutroulis18, Yadu Pokhrel19, Luis Samaniego10, Yoshihide Wada5, Vimal Mishra16, Junguo Liu17, Petra Döll1,2, Fang Zhao20, Anne Gädeke7, Sam Rabin21, and Florian Herz1 Camelia-Eliza Telteu et al.
  • 1Institute of Physical Geography, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, 60438, Germany
  • 2Senckenberg Leibniz Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre (SBiK-F), Frankfurt am Main, 60325, Germany
  • 3Department of Hydrology and Hydraulic Engineering, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, 1050, Belgium
  • 4Key Laboratory of Water Cycle and Related Land Surface Processes, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100101, China
  • 5International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg, 2361, Austria
  • 6National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, 305–8506, Japan
  • 7Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, 14473, Germany
  • 8Institute for Mediterranean Studies, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Rethymno, 74100, Greece
  • 9School of Geography, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
  • 10Department Computational Hydrosystems, UFZ-Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, 04318, Germany
  • 11Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Prague, 16500, Czech Republic
  • 12Institute of Coastal Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Geesthacht, 21502, Germany
  • 13College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058, China
  • 14Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l’Environnement, CEA-CNRS-UVSQ/IPSL, Université Paris Saclay, Gif sur Yvette, 91191, France
  • 15Department of Physical Geography, Utrecht University, Utrecht, 3508, The Netherlands
  • 16ndian Institute of Technology Gandhinagar, Palaj, Gandhinagar, 382355, India
  • 17School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, 518055, China
  • 18School of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Chania, 73100, Greece
  • 19Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, 48824, United States of America
  • 20School of Geographic Sciences, East China Normal University, Shanghai, 200241, China
  • 21Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Meteorology and Climate Research / Atmospheric Environmental Research, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, 82467, Germany

Abstract. Global water models (GWMs) simulate the terrestrial water cycle, on the global scale, and are used to assess the impacts of climate change on freshwater systems. GWMs are developed within different modeling frameworks and consider different underlying hydrological processes, leading to varied model structures. Furthermore, the equations used to describe various processes take different forms and are generally accessible only from within the individual model codes. These factors have hindered a holistic and detailed understanding of how different models operate, yet such an understanding is crucial for explaining the results of model evaluation studies, understanding inter-model differences in their simulations, and identifying areas for future model development. This study provides a comprehensive overview of how state-of-the-art GWMs are designed. We analyze water storage compartments, water flows, and human water use sectors included in 16 GWMs that provide simulations for the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project phase 2b (ISIMIP2b). We develop a standard writing style for the model equations to further enhance model improvement, intercomparison, and communication. In this study, WaterGAP2 used the highest number of water storage compartments, 11, and CWatM used 10 compartments. Seven models used six compartments, while three models (JULES-W1, Mac-PDM.20, and VIC) used the lowest number, three compartments. WaterGAP2 simulates five human water use sectors, while four models (CLM4.5, CLM5.0, LPJmL, and MPI-HM) simulate only water used by humans for the irrigation sector. We conclude that even though hydrologic processes are often based on similar equations, in the end, these equations have been adjusted or have used different values for specific parameters or specific variables. Our results highlight that the predictive uncertainty of GWMs can be reduced through improvements of the existing hydrologic processes, implementation of new processes in the models, and high-quality input data.

Camelia-Eliza Telteu et al.

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on gmd-2020-367', Wouter Knoben, 30 Jan 2021
  • CC1: 'Comment on gmd-2020-367', Charles Vorosmarty, 01 Feb 2021
  • CC2: 'Comment on gmd-2020-367', Charles Vorosmarty, 01 Feb 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on gmd-2020-367', Laura Devitt, 13 Feb 2021
  • AC1: 'Comment on gmd-2020-367', Camelia-Eliza Telteu, 02 Apr 2021

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on gmd-2020-367', Wouter Knoben, 30 Jan 2021
  • CC1: 'Comment on gmd-2020-367', Charles Vorosmarty, 01 Feb 2021
  • CC2: 'Comment on gmd-2020-367', Charles Vorosmarty, 01 Feb 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on gmd-2020-367', Laura Devitt, 13 Feb 2021
  • AC1: 'Comment on gmd-2020-367', Camelia-Eliza Telteu, 02 Apr 2021

Camelia-Eliza Telteu et al.

Model code and software

CESM1.2.2_CLM4.5_freeze_ISIMIP2b (Version CESM1.2.2 - CLM4.5) W. Thiery https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4277137

ESCOMP/CTSM: Update documentation for release-clm5.0 branch, and fix issues with no-anthro surface dataset creation (Version release-clm5.0.34) CTSM Development Team https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3779821

Community Water Model (CwatM) (Version v1.04) P. Burek, M. Smilovic, Y. Satoh, T. Kahil, L. Guillaumot, , T. Tang, P. Greve, Y. and Wada, https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3361478

H08 Version 20190101 N. Hanasaki https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4263375

mesoscale Hydrologic Model (Version v5.8) L. Samaniego, R. Kumar, J. Mai, M. Zink, S. Thober, M. Cuntz, O.Rakovec, D. Schäfer, M. Schrön, J. Brenner, C. M. Demirel, M. Kaluza, B. Langenberg, S. Stisen, S. and Attinger, https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1069203

Executable research compendia (ERC)

PCR-GLOBWB 2 input files version 2017_11_beta_1 (Version v_2017_11_beta_1) E. Sutanudjaja, R. van Beek, N. Wanders, Y. Wada, J. Bosmans, N. Drost, R. van der Ent, I. de Graaf, J. Hoch, K. de Jong, D. Karssenberg, P. López López, S. Peßenteiner, O. Schmitz, M. Straatsma, E. Vannametee, D. Wisser, M. and Bierkens https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1045339

Water And ecosYstem Simulator (Version v1.0) G. Mao and J. Liu https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4255008

Camelia-Eliza Telteu et al.

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Short summary
We analyze water storage compartments, water flows, and human water use sectors included in 16 global water models that provide simulations for the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project phase 2b. We develop a standard writing style for the model equations. We conclude that even though hydrologic processes are often based on similar equations, in the end, these equations have been adjusted or have used different values for specific parameters or specific variables.