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Geoscientific Model Development An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2019-305
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2019-305
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: model evaluation paper 17 Jan 2020

Submitted as: model evaluation paper | 17 Jan 2020

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This preprint is currently under review for the journal GMD.

One-dimensional models of radiation transfer in heterogeneous canopies: A review, re-evaluation, and improved model

Brian N. Bailey1, Maria A. Ponce de León1, and E. Scott Krayenhoff2 Brian N. Bailey et al.
  • 1Department of Plant Sciences, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA USA
  • 2School of Environmental Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON Canada

Abstract. Despite recent advances in the development of detailed plant radiative transfer models, the large-scale canopy models generally still rely on simplified one-dimensional (1D) radiation models based on assumptions of horizontal homogeneity, including dynamic ecosystem models, crop models, and global circulation models. In an attempt to incorporate the effects of vegetation heterogeneity or clumping within these simple models, an empirical clumping factor, commonly denoted by the symbol Ω, is often used to effectively reduce the overall leaf area density/index value that is fed into the model. While the simplicity of this approach makes it attractive, Ω cannot in general be readily estimated for a particular canopy architecture, and instead requires radiation interception data in order to invert for Ω. Numerous simplified geometric models have been previously proposed, but their inherent assumptions are difficult to evaluate due to the challenge of validating heterogeneous canopy models based on field data because of the high uncertainty in radiative flux measurements and geometric inputs. This work provides a critical review of the origin and theory of models for radiation interception in heterogeneous canopies, and an objective comparison of their performance. Rather than evaluating their performance using field data, where uncertainty in the measurement model inputs and outputs can be comparable to the uncertainty in the model itself, the models were evaluated by comparing against simulated data generated by a three-dimensional leaf-resolving model in which the exact inputs are known. A new model is proposed that generalizes existing theory, is shown to perform very well across a wide range of canopy types and ground cover fractions.

Brian N. Bailey et al.

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Brian N. Bailey et al.

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Latest update: 05 Jul 2020
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Short summary
Numerous models of plant radiation interception based on a range of assumptions are available in the literature, but the importance of each assumption is not well-understood. In this work, we evaluate several assumptions common in simple models of radiation interception in canopies with widely-spaced plants by comparing against a detailed, 3D model. This yielded a simple model based on readily measurable parameters that could accurately predict interception for a wide range of architectures.
Numerous models of plant radiation interception based on a range of assumptions are available in...
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