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Geoscientific Model Development An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2019-304
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2019-304
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  06 Dec 2019

06 Dec 2019

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A revised version of this preprint was accepted for the journal GMD and is expected to appear here in due course.

Simulating the Early Holocene demise of the Laurentide Ice Sheet with BISICLES (public trunk revision 3298)

Ilkka S. O. Matero1,2, Lauren J. Gregoire1, and Ruza F. Ivanovic1 Ilkka S. O. Matero et al.
  • 1University of Leeds, United Kingdom
  • 2Alfred Wegener Institute, Germany

Abstract. Simulating the demise of the Laurentide Ice Sheet covering the Hudson Bay in the early Holocene (10-7 ka) is important for understanding the role of accelerated changes in ice sheet topography and melt in the 8.2 ka event, a century long cooling of the Northern Hemisphere by several degrees. Freshwater released from the ice sheet through a surface mass balance instability (known as the saddle collapse) has been suggested as a major forcing for the 8.2 ka event, but the temporal evolution of this pulse has not been constrained. Dynamical ice loss and marine interactions could have significantly accelerated the ice sheet demise, but simulating such processes requires computationally expensive models that are difficult to configure and are often impractical for simulating past ice sheets. Here, we developed an ice sheet model setup for studying the Laurentide Ice Sheet’s Hudson Bay saddle collapse and the associated meltwater pulse in unprecedented detail using the BISICLES ice sheet model, an efficient marine ice sheet model of the latest generation, capable of refinement to kilometre-scale resolution and higher-order ice flow physics. The setup draws on previous efforts to model the deglaciation of the North American Ice Sheet for initialising the ice sheet temperature, recent ice sheet reconstructions for developing the topography of the region and ice sheet, and output from a general circulation model for a representation of the climatic forcing. The modelled deglaciation is in agreement with the reconstructed extent of the ice sheet and the associated meltwater pulse has realistic timing. Furthermore,the peak magnitude of the modelled meltwater equivalent (0.07–0.13 Sv) is compatible with geological estimates of freshwater discharge through the Hudson Strait. The results demonstrate that while improved representation of the glacial dynamics and marine interactions are key for correctly simulating the pattern of early Holocene ice sheet retreat, surface mass balance introduces by far the most uncertainty. The new model configuration presented here provides future opportunities to quantify the range of plausible amplitudes and durations of a Hudson Bay ice saddle collapse meltwater pulse and its role in forcing the 8.2 ka event.

Ilkka S. O. Matero et al.

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Ilkka S. O. Matero et al.

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Simulations of the Early Holocene demise of the Laurentide Ice Sheet with BISICLES (public trunk r3298) I. S. O. Matero, L. J. Gregoire, and R. F. Ivanovic https://doi.org/10.5285/7e0b2d81-ee71-48d6-a901-3b417d482072

Ilkka S. O. Matero et al.

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Short summary
Eight thousand years ago, the N. hemisphere cooled by several degrees for a century, due to the collapse of an ice sheet in N. America that released large amounts of meltwater to the North Atlantic and slowed down its circulation. We numerically model the ice sheet to understand its evolution during this event. Our results match data thanks to good ice dynamics, but depend mostly on surface melt and snowfall. Further work will help us understand how past and future ice melt affects climate.
Eight thousand years ago, the N. hemisphere cooled by several degrees for a century, due to the...
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